Consequences of our Acidic Oceans

Consequences of our Acidic Oceans

Consequences of our Acidic Oceans

As we all know there’s been a rapid increase in the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere as a direct consequence of our way of life, burning fossil fuels for our primary source of electricity. This has had many negative effects on the earth and all environments around us. Trees are a great roll player in the photosynthesis process whereby they turn the CO2 in the air into breathable oxygen for all living creatures, and while the recent drives to plant trees and stop deforestation are great and should be continued, it is should not be our only concern in searching for a solution for the quest to decrease CO2. The ocean absorbs about a quarter of the CO2 we release into the atmosphere every year.

The ocean is absorbing about half of the man-made CO2 that is in the air.  Carbonic acid is what is formed when CO2 is absorbed in the ocean, thus resulting in Ocean Acidification.

The acidification of the ocean has many effects, not only on the ocean species but on a global scale as well. Did you know that the zooplankton in the ocean is responsible for producing most of the earth’s oxygen?

Coral reefs are also an integral part of the ocean’s balance, not only do they provide shelter for millions of little creatures but they also provide food for many of them. The increase in the acid levels is significantly reducing the ability of reef-building corals to produce their skeletons.

Have you ever heard of Pteropods? Better known as the sea’s butterflies, they are also a major food source for many different species underwater, but most importantly to the North Pacific juvenile salmon. By 2100 these Pteropods will have literally slowly dissolved, if the acidity level keeps rising at the current rate.

It is also affecting shelled organisms, and as a result the entire underwater food web. The fact is that there are limited information and research available on this topic, but scientists all agree on one thing, and that is that the changes in the chemistry of the ocean can only lead to catastrophe, and we need to act as fast as possible if we want to prevent it from happening.

Globally over a billion people depend directly or indirectly on the ocean for their primary source of subsidence. Do you know that burning 1 ton of coal emits 2.86 tonnes of CO2, it is estimated that in 2011 the U.S alone emitted about 1.87 billion tonnes of CO2.

Now is the time to seriously consider renewably energy sources like wind and solar. The prices of renewable energy solutions are currently at an all-time low and it is more affordable now than ever before. It is time that the countries that signed the Paris agreement all stand together and reach realistic ways in which to reach their goals, I believe the answer is in government funded renewable energy plants, instead of building new coal plants, yes a wind or solar energy plant may be more expensive initially, but if the running costs were to be considered, they quickly seem more and more viable. There is no coal to mine, or buy, minimal waste and footprint on its environment.

What is your standpoint on coal vs renewable energy?